Acupuncture

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Image by Nina Garman from Pixabay

“Girl…you’re getting old!!” That’s what my body would tell me if it could talk. In fact, my body does talk to me, just not in words. For example, when I wake up every single  morning for months and my back hurts, it’s probably time to get a new mattress, or at least flip over the one we have. When I get up from the couch and my hip hurts, it might be telling me that it’s cold or raining out. When my shoulder hurts as I pull on a t-shirt, even after going to the physical therapist for treatment, it might be a sign to go to acupuncture for all of the above. After all, nothing else worked.

I first sought relief for my knee, which I had already seen the doctor for numerous times. We tried an anti-imflammatory and muscle relaxer, neither of which worked. The doctor suggested a cortisone injection. That didn’t work, either. So I lived with the pain for a while, then finally decided to seek acupuncture.

I had never before thought about using acupuncture, which is an ancient form of Chinese medicine. Needles are inserted just below your skin (it doesn’t hurt) on various points on your body. For example, the acupuncturist inserted needles around my toes when he was healing my knee. To be honest, I don’t know how all this works.

Different acupuncture practices have different vibes. Some are clinical: you’re led to a room, and the acupuncturist comes in and takes care of you. I went to something called a community acupuncture place. There was only one room that seated maybe 6 people at a time. Everyone was in various stages of their healing processes.

This turned me off at first, the idea of being with other people in the room while I’m healing. But I brought my ear buds with me each time so I could listen to my meditation app while I waited the 45 minutes or however long it took to wait. Also, I scheduled my appointments to be as close to opening time as possible, so I could pick the seat that I wanted.

I saw the acupuncturist once a week for maybe 2 months. They can’t heal you with just one visit, which is how I thought it worked; you have to go several times for it to take effect. And it worked. My knee still hurt for a short time after I stopped going to acupuncture, but now the pain is gone.

I’ve read that depression and anxiety can be helped by acupuncture, but I haven’t tried it. From what I understand, it takes several months to treat. I’m pretty much at the end of my rope with my anxiety, so maybe I’ll try it.


Have you ever been treated with acupuncture? If not, would you consider it?

Author:

I hold an MFA in poetry from The Ohio State University. I'm a fiction writer, blogger, wife, pet mom, and Ohio State Buckeye!

10 thoughts on “Acupuncture

  1. I have never tried acupuncture, but I have heard wonderful things about it.
    I have had back and knee problems since my twenties. Over the last two years, my orthopedic has injected gell shots into both knees. This is a process of three weeks in a row, a shot in both each time. I have to have the shots done every six months.
    Since I started losing a little weight over the last month, that has helped relieve some of the pain on my knees. I due for more shots come August. Hopefully, if I lose more weight, I may not have to get them.
    Oh… This morning, I noticed that two of your comments in regards to all the WP issues ended up in my spam folder. Shocker! So, I’m sorry if I didn’t respond. I have gone through the WP tech service, and they are worthless. Why do I know this? Because I’ve gone to them every month at least twice. ARGH!

  2. I’m glad it’s helped you Barb, would I go? I’m not sure as for the amount of aches and pains I’ve got, I would look like a pin cushion 😂👍

  3. Acupuncture is on my list of treatments to try for both physical and mental pain. I’m still trying to talk myself into going to see a chiropractor! My son swears by his. – Also. My daughter is a U of M graduate. Go Blue! 😀

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